Research lines into Bunions

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The hallux valgus or bunion continues being a problem that affects a large number of people and causes a decrease in the quality of life, as it can start to produce incapacitating symptoms that make it difficult to perform usual activities in some patients.

There have been many advances in the field of surgery and anaesthesia during the last 20 years, meaning that the treatment is safer, lasts longer, and the post-operative pain and patient comfort during the surgery is better. This has made it possible for the large majority of foot surgeries to be performed on an outpatient basis, and that the patient is able to support the foot and be independent from the first day.

Minimally invasive or percutaneous surgery of the foot should also improve the outcomes in the future and achieve better and safer indications.

Efforts are still concentrated on achieving a less painful follow-up and an early recovery. For this reason, in the future, it is expected to improve the anaesthetic procedures or the analgesic prescriptions and achieve surgical techniques that improve recovery.

The prevention and the non-surgical treatments of this condition have barely advanced. There is no doubt that treatments will be found in the future that may prevent its onset. In this sense, the relationship between the loss of elasticity of the tissues due to age and the increase in hallux valgus appearing in the population over 40 years-old, is being investigated.

Substantiated information by:

Cristina Casals
Jordi Fluvià
Jessica Martínez
Daniel Poggio

Published: 20 February 2018
Updated: 20 February 2018

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